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carolina, north carolina, texas, mississippi, colorado. i don't know, pretty red states. unfriendliest, new jersey, california, michigan. >> liberal, liberal. >> go to mississippi for vacation. >> oakland is a beautiful city that is rotten. it is rotten because of liberal policy. >> i want to agree with my colleague here from wherever he is from. you are right. if you look at just the crime rates i would bet you the crime rates up against you would find a direct correlation. >> and economic freedom. if you look at a person's ability to start a business and sustain. if you go to places like in the top ten you will have that opportunity plus i think the weather is great in sonoma, california. >> the weather is great in oakland. >> it is because it is unfriendly. >> right to work states. no taxation. >> that's what they stop and think about because they are happier. they don't pay taxes. they don't have to pay union dues. >> can you blame detroit for being unfriendly? >> i wouldn't want there to be a city. >> i wouldn't want to live there. also, albany has the state government of new york. so
of mississippi where races suffocating part of everyday life. cory's version of the best was yet no idea these were police. he shot and fired one of these figures to protect himself and his daughter and as soon as he realized, surrendered in chapters 10 to three bullets left in the gun. the states version was cory the out the window and saw a team of police is coming at him, that he decided to take them on with a handgun that he shot and killed one of them and surrendered with the listen again. decide which of those those in areas hit by more plausible. basically he had a roach in his house that would lend him a $50 fine. he was charged and convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death. i was scared to the legal stuff that happened in between. eventually a couple years ago from his conviction was overturned by the mississippi supreme court. the prosecutors decided they would allow him to plead with manslaughter and he would get time served. at this point in prison for 10 years. at his homecoming party in mississippi, taking kids out for rides on his four wheeler and everybody's happ
28th, 1955, emmett till was dragged from his cousin's home in mississippi and lynched. that lynching was part of what launched a civil rights movement. in 1963 on august 28th, dr. king stood and articulated a dream for the nation. on august 28th, 2008, president obama or then senator obama stood and accepted the nomination of the democratic party for the u.s. presidency. today, he will speak to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march. from that lynching on august 28th to this moment of an african-american president on august 28th, there have been real accomplishments. there have been real changes. we have to acknowledge that, in fact, we have made progress as a country. at the same time, that we must absolutely recognize the continuing structural barriers that exist in terms of economic inequality, unfairness in the workplace, lack of opportunity in housing, often lack of opportunity in education from k through 12, as well as in higher education, and, of course, the realities of continuing residential segregation that impact everything from our health to our opportunities to ge
building of the kiesler air force base inbiloxi, mississippi. asyo middle of quite a heft at this lightening storm. >> got hit right there. >> oh. >> whoa! >> what did i say? i got that [ bleep ], bro. >> a gigantic bolt comes down right exactly smack dab where this guy said he thought the bolt was going to strike. >> it hit like right there. >> you can't predict that! is it real? is it real? >> yeah. yeah. >> so he really did predict where that lightening would sfliek. >> he didn't necessarily predict it, he said, what if it hit right there, right in front of us. >> hit right there. >> boom! right in front of this guy. >> wow. >> that is close. >> that's kind of like serious hand of god lightening right there. >> alleluia. >> are they filming from the cover of any kind of shelter? because it seems like they're standing just outside in the storm. it's amazing that the lightening struck the top of the building and not right where they were standing. >> yeah. it's a positive thing when the lightening is coming down. it looks like something you can reach up and grab. other bo
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
in mississippi. >> guyot: people talked about his being from mississippi, being poor. >> his mother was a teenaged bride. they picked cotton, they worked the land. that's a hard living. >> barry: and i grew up dirt, dirt, dirt, dirt poor. did all kind of odd jobs, you know, hustling pop bottles. back in the day you could get old rags and sell them too. >> guyot: people talked about his lifting himself up by his bootstraps and... >> reporter: you were an eagle scout, you were a member of the national honor society, you played varsity basketball, you received a masters in chemistry, you were on your way to a doctorate and then you shifted gears. >> barry: i think that movement was the catalyst and the lightning rod for the country, and i'm proud to have been a part of it. >> guyot: his civil rights work resonated with people that a lot of other things wouldn't have resonated with. >> johnson: he had instant credibility. as well he should have. >> effi: i don't know if i should say it, but we were living together, i said, "well, what are we going to do? i mean, you know, you can't be l
for the kennedy justice department. in 1963 in mississippi, john stepped between angry protesters and armed police to prevent a potential massacre after the murder of medgar evers. that was the kind of lawyer and later he was. years later he gave me a photo. our nation's greatness is not a birthright, it must be earned by every generation and i am confident that we can earn it for this time.
in mississippi could not vote and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislative codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied, but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought for us to have the precious right for us to vote for us to sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished. we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights acted protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant theft of the black vote. paramount to martin luther king junior's fervent dream was the commitment that african-americans gained full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today with 12% unemployment rates in the african-american community and 38% of all children of color in this country living below the level of poverty, we know the dream is far from being realized.
first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river. >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> no. i don't know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we have news this morning. developing story out of the michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by mistreating carson patients. the fed raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl oldest rookie, 2 years old. brian banks is getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story, you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and you may have seen the can chilo infomercial, and this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products through their paces. that's coming up. >>> but to the major development, the end of a certain in idaho's back country for a murder suspect on the run with a teenage girl. he was shot dead by an fbi tack day cal agent, and this morning, his victim, 16-year-old hannah anderson is to be reunited with her fathe
of quebec. who first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river? >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> yes, no, i don't. >> where did you go to school? >> i don't even know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we do have some news this morning. coming up. developing story out of michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by allegedly mistreating cancer patients. the feds have raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl's oldest rookie. he's 28 years old. after serving time for a crime he didn't commit, brian banks is finally getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story and his attitude is extraordinary. you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and in these dog days of summer, you may have seen the infomercials for the items such as the chillow. that's a pillow that keeps your head cool while you sleep. this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products throug
. >> it depends in the context of the time in which you were raised. i was raised in the '60 sglsh mississippi. >> not only that a student of my history. i said this many times, it's not a part of who i am to use that word. i understand why other people do. it's impossible for me to do it because i know the history, and i know that for so many of my relatives whom i don't know, who i don't know by name, people who i'm connected to, ancestors, that was the last word they heard as they were being strung up by a tree. that was the last sense of degradation that they experienced as, you know, some harm was caused to them. i just -- it's just not a part of the fabric of who i am. so out of respect to those who have come before and the price that they paid to rid themselves of being relegated to that word, i just don't use it. >> well, we had a fascinating conversation. we'll have more on my interview tomorrow on "360." it opens tomorrow. >>> the custody battle over veronica may be near a breaking pointment the adopted parents are in oklahoma tonight trying to bring her home. the lawyers from both s
. you saw selma in the 1965 voting rights act. you saw the mississippi summer project in the 1964 civil rights bill. you saw affirmative action, you saw all of these things grow out of that. you saw an effort to empower marginalize eed people across te country. we used the model we were using in terms of organizing and sex-determination pulling people together so they could take control of their own lives. those models were actually both things that grew out of the movement. washington is one of those epic points that there are a number of other epic points that actually pulled this whole process together. i think it's important to understand that even on the struggles on the march on washington, get the message out. >>ifill: we are still having big national conversations as they say about race, still coming out of the trayvon martin episode. and i wonder as you look back we wonder whether it's leadership that's missing, whether we're just not honest as a people in discussing these issues or whether we've come much further than they give us credit for? >> i think we have come a long way
discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river. >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> yes. no, i don't. >> where did you go to school? >> i don't know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we have news this morning. developing story out of the michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by mistreating cancer patients. the fed raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this case this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl's oldest rookie, he's 28 years old, and after serving times for a crime he did not commit. brian banks is getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story, his attitude is great. you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and you may have seen the can chillow infomercial, and this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products through their paces. that's coming up. >>> but to the major development, the end of a search in idaho's back country for a murder suspect on the run with a teenage girl
is alive this morning. we say hey y'all. fine folks from mississippi. >> tupelo, mississippi. >> home of elvis presley. thanks for being here this morning. let's show what you can expect today. wilmington, north carolina, hello to everyone watching us this morning, wect. watch for scattered thunderstorms today and temperature right around 85 degrees. it is the same old story for us in the southeast. more showers and storms, including the carolinas, up to the virginias. the rest of the country, primarily dry. hot, especially in the west. exacerbating the fire issues out there. forecast, stalled front across the southeast, more showers and storms. looking beautiful >>> hey, thanks, mike. good morning to you. 8:07. back to work monday. this is san francisco where you can see that compressed marine layer. let's show you what it looks like now on the golden gate bridge where you can hardly see anything at all. please travel cautiously. 72 degrees in the city headed your way. elsewhere, we do have a chance for thunderstorms and we have a red flag warning in place for today, tomorrow, all th
the context here and the whole climate was set. jim was in jail than mississippi. the sheriff's told the black inmates either beat her or we will be to you. so they beat her unconscious. so there were 200 demonstrations of the country that day and people going to jail. the public accommodations bill, the dream was the right to vote. the dream of 66 was in chicago for housing. the treen at 67 was the poor people's campaign to end the war mike in vietnam. dr. king made the case from 32% down to 12 on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. by the way, our hearts were trained with pain johnson had no background on civil rights. only the civil rights legislator in the history of the country and passed with lyndon johnson and 64 kuhl of the voting rights act of 65, daycare, child-care, speeding programs, appellations, the regional council, all of that is lbj. the record matches are lyndon baines johnson. the speech is always around. from the last staff meeting it went something like this. i had a migraine headache for nine days and maybe my time is up. maybe i've done as much as i could do. maybe i shou
can't get fresh salmon. >> mississippi number two, alabama number three. >> bad accents. >> we're the craziest state. >> california tops the list. >> craziest state and you adopt even mention florida? come on. that doesn't make sense at all. >> i've lived in florida and florida has all the of the weirdest news stories. don't certain websites have pages just devoted to florida weird news. >> u.s. news, foreign news, sports, florida. >> colorado also has a lot of weird news. >> fun to talk about. everyone has their own opinion. >>> a sad scene, hundreds of dolphins mysteriously dying along the east coast. why is this happening and what does it have to do with humans? >> and is today the day the -- >> boy band. >> i shouldn't read this. what do i know. it's 'n sync, are they getting together? brand-new evidence your favorite boy band and needless to say mine is making a comeback. >> nervous, tucker is reading this one. he does have all their albums. we're new to town.ells. welcome to monroe. so you can move more effortlessly... we want to open a new account: checking and savings.
tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from mississippi rise? >> mr. speaker, unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, i'm not a fan of government mandates, and neither are my constituents in mississippi. but there is one mandate that the people of mississippi sent me to washington with, to repeal, replace, dismantle, delay, and defund obamacare. i have heard from families, small businesses, and hardworking americans across my district who all have the same message -- this law is a train wreck. mr. palazzo: that is why one of my very first votes in congress was to repeal obamacare. that's why i voted to repeal it nearly 40 times over the last three years. that is why i introduce add constitutional amendment to restore the right of the american people to refuse this bad law. that is also why i firmly believe we must defund obamacare in a continuing resolution this body will take up later this year. i believe this is a fight worth fighting for mississippi. and
.s. senate. the answer is seven beginning in 1870 with rebels of mississippi. this year marked the first time that two ochls servafrican-amer simultaneously served in the senate and if cory booker wins next month, two african-americans together in the senate. lee is the winner! send your suggestions at msnbc.com. we will be right back. ♪ you don't have the time to hang around ♪ ♪ [ whimpers ] - hugs from beneful baked delights... - [ barks ] are crispy, oven-baked dog snacks with soft savory centers, made with beef and cheese. beneful baked delights: a unique collection of four snacks... to help spark play in your day. because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. my electrolux french door refrigerator gives me a lot more entertaining possibilities.. with features like the perfect temp drawer that has a wide variety of temperature settings, i can store anything from desserts to deliciously fresh seafood at the ideal serving temperature. so everything is perfect
27th, 1960, we gathered to hear will campbell, a minister who had been run out of oxford, mississippi for playing ping-pong with a black man the day before we had gotten word from the nashville chief of police that anyone involved for the protests would be arrested. there were some rumors that drp the police did not intend to stop. campbell said, you attempt to sit in, the business community, the local officials, and their -- will all put back. they will let police and the rough element in the white community come into the stories and beat you, but it is your decision. they said go home, another man said, go home. another man said, what's the matter? are you chicken? no sooner did we stake our seats at the upstairs common than some young man began attacking the group downstairs. we immediately went down to join our brothers and sisters. violence does beget violence, but the opposite is just as true. spinning itself, pet -- when there's no fear in facing it. obedient subsided. stomping on people, the police conspicuously absent while we were beaten, arrived quickly after the mob wore t
. the other is mississippi. the women that i've talked to here this morning, are eager to see that change. >> i asked stephanie yesterday if this forum is not so much about a woman president but about hillary clinton. here is ma what she said about that. >> we do hope that hillary clinton will make a decision here and we would like to see her run, but the truth is we also have an incredible list of women on the bench to step up in 2016 if she chooses not to. >> is that really likely? i mean, is this about any woman or is it about really hillary clinton? >> hillary clinton was the first name that came up here. the question that was asked was is this hillary's first campaign event in iowa? there was much laughter in the room. i think the sent many here is that clearly if hillary decides that she is going to run she is the woman that everyone here is going to get behind. that said, they are really focused on building a bench and we have also heard names like senator amy klobuchar and senator kristen gill ibrand and you heard wendy davis name here, she took a stand on abortion down in texas.
but a few structures of the mississippi river valley and the reoccupied western tennessee. in the east ready lee led his ragtag confederate forces, the army of northern virginia to one victory after another of their opposite number. but the victories were all one on virginia soil. and in feeble, the virginia economy even as they defend it. he knew better than any southerner that the confederacy's resources or to limited to keep fending off the confederacy's enemies in definitely. only by carrying the war into the union states and only by leveraging of war weariness public into peace negotiations can the confederacy hope to win. but this was by no means a far fetched up. in the fall of 1862 dissension over president abraham lincoln's emancipation proclamation had cost unhappy voters in new york and new jersey to install democratic governors they're come a new round of anti-war democratic candidates to were due to run in the fall of 1863 governors' elections in ohio and pennsylvania. if those states also turned against the war they could force of abraham lincoln either to begin peace talks or
south carolina tonight. plenty hot in nashville, for mississippi and vanderbilt. up to 91 in honolulu where hawaii plans to knock off southern california. that was a very well-written weather college football -- >> it was. i feel like i know what's going on in weather and college football now. >> who did that, jack? >> had to be jack. kudos to jack! round of applause. [ applause ] from all of us. >>> while we're on the sports theme, let's go to the u.s. open where venus williams its out! >> she battled and battled again in a marathon match against her opponent from china. went all the way to third set, tiebreaker. williams came up just short. this is the third year in a row, williams exited the singles tournament after two rounds. she's also playing doubles with her sister serena. >> before you think the tournament is totally serious. check out a lighter moment there. check that out. it happened during the women's first round match, briefly delayed by the squirrel. unwanted visitor took its time getting off the court as well. eventually tucked in behind a scoreboard. never to be seen
on a de deadly plane crash that happened in alabama. the ups cargo jet went down in mississippi. look at these pictures. huge ball of fire at that scene this morning. it was about a half a mile short of the runway at birmingham international airport. sadly, the pilot and co-pilot were both lost, both fatalities in this terrific histororrific accident. we heard witnesses describing the scene. >> i got out from bed and went to look in the window in the back and a minute later saw a big flash in the air. in the sky. i saw, i heard big big big explosion, big one. it was the crash of the aircraft. >> amazingly no homes on the ground were damaged. much more on this story coming up. >>> jesse jackson senior is speaking about his son's two year sentence he just received for misusing election money. let's listen to what he had to say. >> i had to raise many questions to myself about did i confuse success with sickness. jesse's been driven to succeed, to be effective. remember, we got the water tank built out in fort heights, whatout was, arguing for the airport, something like that. i did not
start to the weekend. jackson, mississippi, 87. little rock, 82. orlando will end up around 90. again, showers >>> good morning. i'm mike nicco. going to be slightly cooler today everywhere. the cooling trend continues tomorrow. but then look at sunday. the sea breeze >> listen, we love, love macklemore. but we had so many great concerts right here in the park. and all of them because of famous footwear. and we have something special. under here, we picked three audience members. they're going to help me out. famous footwear and "gma" have bought a lot of shoes. brand-new shoes for kids that need them. they'll go to the salvation army. and the game we're going to play is guess how many pair of shoes on here. if you win, you get a $100 gift card. i want you to write down your numbers. have an idea. oh, the top, too. there's a lot more shoes under here. there it is. okay. do you have your guesses? and your names are ashley, dahlia and anu, i believe. they're taking their time. on three, one, two, three, show me. all right. 133, the actual number. you win the $100 gift card to famous foo
thomas, the mother of three from mississippi at the new orleans saints training camp as a referee. >> and she is a member of the league's referee training program in line for an official full-time job. "gma" anchor josh elliott has her story. >> here we go. >> reporter: in the bold black and white stripes and hair tucked under that plaque hat, the official looks exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch your step here, 17. little tight. little tight. >> reporter: 39-year-old sarah thomas, married mother of three is on the verge of history. >> are you a tomboy? >> i am a tomboy, yes. but i am married with two boys. >> reporter: poised to become the first ever full time female official for the national football league. >> where's mama? >> 72, you've got to move up on those pass plays. put your guard up. put your guard up. individually, i am a female. a lot of things set us apart. race, gender, different background. but collectively, we're out there for the same goal. >> reporter: for 15 years, on fir -- officiating grade school, high school, and college games. discovered b
, mississippi. >> caller: yes, sir. >> bill: how are you doing? what do you say? >> caller: i'm doing fine. thanks for taking my call, bill. on the smoker's issue, you know, i'm totally against people that are against people smoking. i smoked for 15 years, 1979, i quit for 30 years. and i just picked them back up about three years ago. and i never had an issue with people that smoked whenever i quit smoking. all of my friends smoked. most of them -- i'm just not against -- if people want to smoke, let them smoke. >> bill: i'm with you. here's the deal, why did you pick it up again? you know it's not good for you. >> there are a lot of things aren't good for me. i'm going to die of something some time. it is a freedom of ourselves to do what we want. >> bill: peter, you made that point earlier. living in this country, we are able to make some dumb decisions. >> i respect his decision to do something very dumb and i always hate to hear someone say well, you're going to die of something. yeah, you're going to die of something but if you decide you're going to decide to just all of a sudden st
built a new peline that feeds the jynt wrb refinery near st. louis across the mississippi river and to the refinery. all they have to do is double up on that pipeline, ship the oil down. might cost more in the long run but who know what is they're paying for land leases to the gulf coast. so it's a way to get around the problem. the right of way is already there. you never hear anybody mention it. host: a couple of international stories for you. from the financial times this morning, host: john from boston, massachusetts. caller: i've been watching for a while, what i've learned about politics is sometimes we have a problem i think in this country it's not so much the country any more it has become love of party. i've been watching and no matter what politician you look at in the united states, no matter state or federal, it's become love of party. and where -- they represent the people.shouldn't they doing the for the people? host: doug from springfield. good morning. caller: good morning. my question would be i appreciate you guys and everything you do. i would like some answe
today in louisiana. i got that. >> it is only mississippi, alabama, three states. >> i said that. >> seriously. i think before -- you have never done that? >> i think the panhandle went all the way to louisiana. he was technically maps. if you look at the maps of your late 18th century map maker. >> i think he is tired. >> there are many other states that embrace those conservative values, the approach that we have taken over the years. i am in one today in florida. you look at south carolina. you look at florida -- >> we're in louisiana. >> i know and i said that. i am in one of those states that reflect those today in louisiana. >> we are here. how great is he? >> i want him to run. >> he just might. >> howard stern. >> i would have been scared to do this interview. >> he was good. judge of "america's got talent" they are across the street at radio city music hall. i asked why he wanted to take the gig. >> i took it because i thought it was fun. i was a viewer of the show. i would judge from my bedroom and would go on the air and say i should be a judge on these shows. i will t
of your competitors are holding strong. host: gulfport, mississippi, steve on our republican line. caller: i just wanted to make a couple of comments. one, i'm happy that the department of justice is trying to keep this merger from occurring. but the biggest problem that the airline industry has is that they have terrible, horrible customer service. they ou pay for a ticket, do not guarantee the plane will take off on time, they don't guarantee the plane will arrive on time, and if you happen to be landing in an airport where you have to switch from one airplane to another airplane, they don't even guarantee that they'll land on time and give you now time to get to the second departure or second leg of your trip on to your destination. the biggest problem the airline industry has is a total lack of customer service or customer concern, and that is why there aren't as many people flying as there should be, and that is why they are now charging for things like a bag, ok, if you bring a bag with you, they now charge you for that, and they're nick and he will diming everybody to death, if you
in mississippi a couple of miles from the state penitentiary, they have a program that allows prisoners to leave and make $6 per hour processing chickens. they said they have never had a prisoner last more than two days cleaning chickens. that they would rather be in their cells in prison than work in the chicken processing plant because it is such hard, dirty, nasty work. we are seeing the same thing in arizona. picking lettuce, there are no american workers lining up to do those jobs. host of this tweet -- -- host: this tweet -- guest: if there were? oh, well, a secret about immigration, if you wanted to come to the united states and clean a hotel room or work in a service sector that is not agriculture, there is no way for you to come to this country to work. there is especially no way for you to stay. we do not have a visa category that addresses these people. while we do have an agriculture program, it is small and difficult to use and many employers do not use it. in california they say that 70% of agriculture workers are here illegally and only 4% of the total population are using the h2a
in 1955 in a town called bell zony, mississippi, william moore, a postman from maryland that walked a letter, was walking with a letter to the governor that was murdered, viola, a mother of five, people, regular people, not just the iconic leading we remember but regular people tired of the foot of oppression on their back and stood up and said no, they made the difference. they made this 50th anniversary of the march on washington possible, and i think it is important to remember the sacrifices they made. the southern poverty law center, in fact, was founded to ensure that the promises of that movement would be a reality, become a reality for every person, and so we want to be inspired today by those who came before us. and as congressman lewis said and the clip that you played a little bit ago, that we have got to continue to stand up. we have to continue to demand justice. fredrick douglas says power concedes nothing without a struggle, and certainly the civil rights movement is an example of a struggle by the people. >> civil rights legend andrew young, thank you to you, ben jea
in remote, western kentucky. it's right near the mississippi river in that little part of kentucky that abuts missouri and it's in a town of like 400 people and the candidates come and just the audience heckles them and things get thrown on the stage. i found a story from 1995 and two candidates from secretary of state in kk centucky. his father chants fbi, fbi during a speech. almost a fight, they had to hold him back. that's what's going on in coycoid tco kentucky today. i wonder, rick, we talk about mitch mcconnell last segment. what are kentucky voters going to be see from mitch mcconnell over the next year? >> people underestimate him because he has a soft kind of effect and this guy is not going to play a round and he's not going to take any -- there's not going to be any slack for either allison grimes or his republican opponent. this is a guy who goes for the throat and he's not going to screw around and i think you're going to see he has three things going for him. he has resources and he'll spend them, he'll spend them early, that works. an early understanding of the stat
or in mississippi or in illinois or in california. across this country, people are demanding comprehensive immigration reform, and the end of the deportations of the direction of our families -- destruction of the family. someone in the -- i was in minneapolis-saint paul. the church was full. she bemoaned the fact that more people didn't come. they didn't come. and some were tired and frustrated and they were disillusioned. guess what? virginia is giving the example today no one has a right to be tired. [cheering and applause] nobody has a right to be disillusioned. nobody has a right to give up on this fight. because today 1,200 people will be deported. hundreds of children will be left without a poem -- mom or a dad. without husband or wife. the fear that permeates our community and the underclass that exploited every day has to come to an end. you don't are -- have a right to be tired. you have a responsibility to fight and make it a greater and better nation for us to live. virginia today is giving that example. thank you so much. [applause] [cheering and applause] [inaudible] [speakin
voting right cases for department.justice in 1963 in mississippi, john stepped between angry protesters and armed police to prevent a potential massacre after the murder of medgar evers. that was the kind of lawyer and later he was. years later, he gave me a photo with an inscription from tennyson's ulysses. to strive, to seek to a find, and not to yield. our nation's greatness is not a birthright. it must be earned by every generation. i am confident that we can earn it for this time. we are at our best one we live our values, including our devotion to democracy and protection under the rule of law when we widen that circle of opportunity and extend dignity to all of our citizens. i believe strongly that that is what is called for today. there is no group that i have more confidence in being able to rise and meet that challenge than the lawyers of america and particularly, the american bar association. thank you all very much. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> americans for tax reform president
. >> thank you for your comment from mississippi. two cherry valley, illinois. >> they keep talking about this affordable care act. nobody has ever come up with any figures about how affordable it is. for people that do not have insurance and are supposed to get insurance, who is subsidizing these people that are going to pay for that? the government? are they taxing everybody else to subsidize that? where are the figures at? they keep coming up with these laws and saying we have to still implement it. they should have known when they passed this law what they were going to do with it. but nancy pelosi said you had to pass the bill before you knew what was in it. they still did not know what is in it. >> we appreciate all your calls and comments this evening and more online on facebook and twitter. here is one on the healthcare bill from duane who says -- a couple of other comments. this one has to do with the death of jack tremont -- jack germond. also, from senator roy blunt of missouri. he says -- jack germond died today at the age of 85. he was 85. he was on this network and number of
into a settlement agreement with the school district in meridian, mississippi, in which we found egregious examples of disproportionate suspension, expulsion, and school-based arrests. a black male high school student was told by one of his teachers that when he got older, he would either be in hell or in jail. andas suspended subsequently arrested for wearing the wrong socks to school. there was another black male high school student. an administrator asked him to tuck your shirt into his pants. he refused. the principal grabbed him in a headlock and he school security officer sprayed the student with mace. he was arrested and sent to juvenile detention. aree kinds of examples horrible. they have lifelong -- often lifelong consequences for students who are treated in this way. often times, they are unlawful. that is where the justice department can come in. we enforce the laws that bar discrimination by schools based on race, national origin, sex, and religion. that is what we did. we went into meridian, we investigated, we found that black students received harsher disciplinary consequences. susp
this huge crowd from mississippi. >> how has your time in new york been? >> wonderful. is coming here the highlight? >> absolutely. >> we are talking about his fire with areas of the west. >> overnight it went from a 60,000 acre fire to a 120,000 acre fire. 150 miles from san francisco you might think they get a big part of their water. 80% of their water comes from the hetch hetchy reservoir. there is rainfall going into the southwest. it won't come on shore with the tropical storm. southern california could be getting heavy rain falling in quick amounts of time. all of the areas that you see have flood watches and warnings going on. a couple of inches of rain have fallen and there is flooding going on. we'll send it back to you inside. >> well, remember the benghazi attacks were at a year september 11th, 2012 and we still don't have a lot of answers and folks behind bars. suspects have been identified in this attack. we are learning new information and sources told fox news that the special operations group that we put in charge of getting these guys are getting out. here is what a
.the burden on the we went out one time to mississippi. we were there, and then we went andto earning him alabama we heard the same story time and again. a woman being abused. a neighbor or woman calls up, and guess who goes to jail. the person who called them because they say that woman does not have papers. what does law enforcement due? that is why you have to separate law enforcement from immigration policy. the police are there to protect the people. they have to protect the women and the families. it is fine and dandy to talk about safety, but we have to understand just how safety really has a corrosive effect. the police, their cars are important to them to protect them. their guns are important to them . their communication, their training is important, but the most important tool, instrument that the police have is the people and the cooperation of the people. pass immigration law to criminalize all emigrants and make them fear the police, you make all of us less safe and you make us all a nation in which we perpetrate injustice on people here who have been submitted to crimes an
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